Introduction to Omeka: Creating Digital Collections and Exhibits

I am the alpha and the Omeka. Sounds better that way. I wonder how many other people have made that lame joke. Anyways, checking out some Omeka sites was interesting to see what institutions have been using it for. Digital History is always great to see how people use their interface to explore the project on display in the virtual world. For example, looking at Humboldt State University’s site on the Humboldt Redwoods Project the interface is fairly basic. Using hyperlinks, the project keeps viewers occupied by clicking to a different page to further explore different aspects of the history of Redwoods. There are four exhibits, each with subsections that include historic photographs and documents linked to the HSU’s collection website. Also included is a map to show spatial where these photos and documents were created.

In a similar vein you have the Hermoupolis Digital Heritage Management (HERMES) site that uses spatial data of a Greek town to document historic buildings and determine where conservation efforts are needed. The map page with pictures of the historic buildings is very cool to look through, even if the captions are all in Greek. The site itself could use some maintenance, as there are some links that don’t work and tags aren’t grouping correctly, but exploring the map/photos and the overall goal of the project are fantastic. Whereas Humboldt Redwoods Project has more historical information, I am drawn to the preservation efforts HERMES is attempting to make. Also, their algorithm to determine historic buildings at risk seems cutting edge and seeing the results, the catalog of  at risk buildings and proposed conservation plan, would be very enlightening. While the HRP site is much cleaner and more functional, providing more information, the HERMES site is trying something new and innovative which is why I proclaim it Omeka site of the week!!!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s